When China takes oil, we can’t go home

When China takes oil, we can’t go home

China’s oil industry has a history of taking over major energy projects with little regard for public safety.

Now it’s trying to take over a major oilfield that has been in the Chinese government’s sights for more than 50 years.

China announced Thursday it plans to invest $3.8 billion in the massive Almaden Oil Field in western South Australia, the first of what will be several projects it hopes will spur the production of oil and gas in the area.

China has also proposed drilling a liquefied natural gas terminal in the Pilbara, and has proposed building a pipeline that would carry liquefying natural gas to the coast.

The move is a big win for China, which has long sought to diversify its oil resources.

The company has long been an oil powerhouse and it has the world’s largest reserves of oil.

But China’s ambitions are driven by domestic demand for energy, and the potential of liquefaction.

The new project, which will include a gas field that will be more than 40 million barrels of oil, is the largest in South Australia and the first major oil discovery in the country since the late 1960s.

It comes just days after China’s foreign ministry announced it had completed a deal to sell its largest overseas oil field, known as the “Cambodia Oil Fields,” to the UAE for $2.8 trillion.

China hopes the deal will enable it to tap into the vast domestic energy potential in South Australian resources.

“Almaden is the first natural gas field located in Australia that can potentially benefit from the liquefactors market and export it into the global market,” said the Foreign Ministry in a statement.

The announcement comes amid a series of reports that Chinese companies are trying to get into oilfield development in Australia.

Last week, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) warned that China is planning to export liquefaceproof gas, a gas commonly used in liquefiering operations, to Australia in the next two years.

But the AP revealed that the gas would be produced at a facility in China.

The Chinese government has been seeking to develop liquefactions in Australia for decades, with the country’s most recent bid for a liquifier to the United States failing.

China also announced last year that it was looking to drill for oil in the region, but the field is only a fraction of the size of the Pilbarans Almadens.

China’s state-owned oil company, CNOOC, also announced it was drilling in the Almadenos in the past.

In a press release, CNEPC said the AlMaden Oil Fields would “provide an important source of gas for Australia’s energy sector.”

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